A Bird's Eye View on Home Improvement

How much does a pothole cost?

Posted by on Oct 8, 2017 in Car Accidents | 0 comments

The cost may seem rather minuscule, at least on a government level. All it takes is the pay for employees, the equipment, and the gas to run everything. The actual work is fairly quick, as we all know. If you drive by construction workers filling a pothole in the morning, they are gone without any evidence they were ever there by the time you come home in the afternoon.

For that quick service, it may cost somewhere around $150, depending on a whole lot of factors (the contractors, where in the country the hole is, whether it’s in a city, town, or in the country, whether it’s one or many holes, how big the hole…you get the idea). The service can be much cheaper than that depending on if it is fixed by the Department of Transport (as little as $23 per hole) or private contractors (who are closer to that initial $150 number).

However, sometimes that work can also cost significantly more, particularly when tarring the road to fill cracks. For that service, Department of Transport would charge over $300 a mile, and contractors would charge double that. Better a hole than a crack, it seems.

That, however, is not the end of the discussion, since it is possible a pothole could cost a whole lot more. Consider the person whose tire is destroyed by a pothole. For that person, the pothole cost perhaps $100, perhaps more if any other damage occurred.

Then, consider the people involved in an accident due to a pothole. If the accident is serious, and it can be proved the pothole caused it, the local government may be liable. It is possible to sue your town if you’ve been in an accident due to a pothole. You can contact a lawyer about the pothole, give your story, and put your case forward.

In theory, then, a pothole could cost a town thousands, perhaps significantly more than that, all depending on how serious the accident is.

Perhaps not surprisingly, these cases are rarely successful. Accidents are complicated, and it’s hard for a pothole to be the sole cause. Still, it is a risk the government takes when it takes its time filling in the holes in the road.

This risk can be aggravated by any number of issues as well, from budget cuts that leave holes longer than usual to whether that might lead to more cracks and holes that can be dealt with quickly.

As always, the best course of action is simply to be careful, to assume there is a hole around every corner, and to assume further that any damage will be yours to cover. Otherwise, you might be out more than $150, and you may have a hard time getting that money back unless your lawyer is particularly good.

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