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Causes of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Posted by on Nov 16, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that affects one of the limbs usually after an injury or trauma to that limb. It is believed that CRPS results from damage to, or malfunction of the peripheral and central nervous system. In CRPS, the damaged nerves are unable to properly control blood flow, feeling, and temperature to the affected area. According to the website of Williams Kherkher, the condition can spread to other parts of the body.

There are two types of CRPS, which have similar symptoms and treatments. CRPS-I formerly reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome involves the absence of confirmed nerve injury. It is most common in the arms or legs after a minor injury. CRPS-II, on the other hand, involves confirmed nerve injuries. It is the result of an injury to the nerve.

Doctors are not sure about the causes of complex regional pain syndrome. In most instances, it results from trauma or injury. It is most commonly triggered by fractures, sprain, soft tissue injuries, limb immobilization, or surgical and medical procedures. Injuries in the small nerve fibers may bring about the different symptoms of CRPS. Abnormalities in the peripheral nerves cause neurological functions in the spinal cord to work abnormally.

CRPS can affect the immune system as well. High level of inflammatory chemicals is present in the tissues of people with the condition. Inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as asthma can also trigger CRPS. Complex regional pain syndrome does not have a single cause but results from several causes that produce similar symptoms. According to some theories, pain receptors in the affected part of the body responds to catecholamines, a group of nervous system messengers. It is believed that complex regional pain syndrome disrupts the healing process. Emotional stress may also trigger complex regional pain syndrome.

On certain occasions, CRPS develops without any injury. It may be caused by an infection, a blood vessel problem, or an entrapment of the nerves.

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Large Truck Accidents: Common Causes

Posted by on May 11, 2015 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

The high number of road accidents remains a serious problem across America. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), a total of 32,719 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes during the year 2013. About 3,000 of these victims died in accidents involving large trucks. These numbers point to a rather disturbing trend involving the larger vehicles motorists are usually sharing the road with. As the IIHS puts it, about 1 in 10 highway fatalities occur because of large truck accidents. Considering the way that these trucks overpower all other types of vehicles, it’s easy to surmise why these incidents result in outcomes that are so tragic and devastating.

As one can imagine, any collision between a large truck and a smaller vehicle can easily turn to a catastrophic scenario. Large trucks like 18-wheelers and tractor-trailers can weigh around 20 to 30 times more than regular passenger cars. These vehicles are also much larger and have greater ground clearance. This makes large trucks much harder to control and maneuver. Due to its weight, a truck will require a longer distance before being able to come to a full stop. Its sheer size also gives a truck more blind spots or no-zones.

As a result, truck operators are not able to see the vehicles surrounding them easily. Experienced drivers are trained to keep a safe distance from other vehicles and keep an eye out on these no-zones. However, a slight mistake can easily have some deadly consequences. In some of the worst cases, cars can slide beneath a truck. The consequences can become even more severe when large trucks hit motorcyclists, bicyclists, or pedestrians.

Aside from no-zones, the website of McCutchen & Sexton – The Law Firm also points to other factors that commonly contribute to large truck accidents. According to their experience, accidents can also occur due to fatigue or distracted driving, as well as improper training. Trucks carrying improper or overweight load are also more susceptible to accidents. In some cases, truck accidents are also caused by vehicles that don’t receive proper maintenance and upkeep.

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The Severe Consequences of Truck Accidents

Posted by on Jul 23, 2014 in Personal Injury | 2 comments

On May 29, 2013, near Syracuse, New York, a truck’s trailer came loose and crashed into an approaching minivan; of the minivan’s eight passengers, seven were killed – four children, with ages ranging from 4 – 7, and three adults.

A week earlier, on May 24, somewhere in Washington state, a truck rammed into a bridge’s support beams, causing one area of the bridge to collapse and sending cars, with their drivers inside, into the cold waters of the Skagit River.

In the accidents mentioned above, the truck drivers were perfectly safe; the victims, however, were either dead or severely injured. This is a usual result of motor vehicle accidents were trucks are involved. Due to the size of trucks, as well as the much heavier materials these are made of, losses (whether lives and/or properties) are always on the side of the much smaller, or slower, vehicle).

Every year, about 4,500 deaths in accidents that involve trucks are reported to the Department of Transportation. The US DOT, with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and each state’s department of transportation, which has its own set of laws that govern the trucking industry, work together to lessen truck accidents and make US roads and highways safe, especially for other motorists.

Besides laws that mandate trucking firms to ensure that trucks are always in good condition (requiring regular checking and maintenance of these huge vehicles), laws are also imposed regarding the hiring and training of truck drivers (including mandates to keep drivers, who lack the skills required in operating a truck safely, off the road). Laws also specify the maximum number of hours that drivers are allowed to drive continuously and the total number of hours of rest they should be given.

The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for commercial drivers has also been set to 0.04%, while on January 3, 2012, a mandate on the total banning of cell phone use (which included reaching for, holding or dialing a cell phone) was passed. This was followed, a year after, by a law, which required the use of a Bluetooth headset, a safe way of taking and making calls without losing one’s focus on the road.

The laws were specifically intended to address the identified major factors that caused trucke accidents – driver fatigue and sleepiness, drunk-driving and distraction due to cell phone use. There are many other laws and standards imposed by the government to make roads safer from trucks, as truck accidents almost always lead to catastrophic results. If involved in a truck accident, victims should seek the help of a personal injury lawyer. The tort law, under which personal injury is classified, can be more than complicated to the victims and their families. Allowing a highly-qualified and competent lawyer to represent victims is, sometimes, the only means to enable these victims to merit the compensation that they legally deserve.

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Actos’ Adverse Effects are Obvious Acts of Negligence

Posted by on Oct 18, 2013 in Defective Pharmaceuticals, Personal Injury | 1 comment

For a number of years after 1999, Type II diabetes patients benefitted from an oral drug that helped them manage their blood sugar level and reduced the quantity of glucose released by the liver. With no known cure to their illness and fully confident of their doctor’s capabilities, Type II diabetics accepted whatever drug was prescribed to them.

One oral drug that was recognized as very promising was Actos. Produced by Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc., and certified by the US Food and Drug Administration, Actos, or Pioglitazone, was released to the market in 1999. A year after its release, the drug was approved by the French Medicines Agency for distribution in France and then eight years later, it became one of the 10 most prescribed oral diabetes drugs in the US.

Since its release millions of people around the globe have been prescribed with the drug Actos. Thus, in 2010 many were taken aback by with the findings of a group of researches that studied Actos. The study brought into the open the many adverse effects caused by the drug, which Takeda maintained to be totally safe.

The effects ranged from mild to life-threatening; some patients have even suffered death due to Actos. Some of the mild effects caused by Actos include urinary tract infection, hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, upper respiratory infection, fever, dizziness, muscle pain, chills, limb pain and diarrhea. The severe ones are bladder cancer, lactic acidosis, heart and liver failure and macular edema.

In 2011 France and Germany banned the distribution of Actos in their countries. During this same year too the estimated number of lawsuits that seemed would be filed against the drug’s manufacturer Takeda reached more than 10,000.

Many more are expected to come to the open and seek justice from Takeda’s great act of irresponsibility and negligence. Type II diabetes is serious and hard enough for anyone to suffer from; adding bladder cancer to one’s suffering would redound to a major unjust offense.

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Medical Malpractice Suits Curb the Threat of Bankruptcy

Posted by on Sep 21, 2013 in Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury | 0 comments

Working as a medical professional is a high pressure job for numerous reasons. Not only is the well-being of their patient largely dependent upon their knowledge and actions, but they are also held accountable by insurance and pharmaceutical bureaucracies. Insurance agencies can help curb high surgical and prescription costs for patients. However, whenever a patient needs constant attention the cost of medical costs can be financially crippling. Patients who have been the victim of medical malpractice are often entitled to financial compensation in order to help curb medical costs, even bankruptcy. According to the website of Pohl & Berk, LLP, medical malpractice happens when the accepted quality of medical care hasn’t been met, causing injury or wrongful death to the patient. “Accepted quality of care” means to say that most reasonable doctors would agree that the care offered to the patient was adequate and competent.

Some common forms of medical malpractice include, but are not limited to, wrong diagnosis, delayed treatment, improper treatment, lack of informed consent, surgical errors, emergency room errors, pharmaceutical errors, wrongful death, and hospital negligence. These are often mistakes that no reasonable hospital should make. Imagine the amount of neglect that would have to occur for a person to make a mistake as heinous as amputating the wrong limb from a patient or prescribing the wrong medication.

The Texas Medical Board allows Texas patients to report medical incidents and research physicians’ history. The intention of the Texas Medical Board is to keep the Texas health industry accountable so that the public can make informed decisions about their healthcare. At their meetings, based on reported violations, the board administers disciplinary action against doctors. These disciplinary actions span from suspensions, revocations, cease and desist orders, orders due to impairment, inadequate medical recording, criminal behavior, quality of care orders, and non-therapeutic prescribing. In the fall of 2013, 41 doctors spanning across the state were disciplined. The most common disciplinarian action taken by the Texas Medical Board is to hand out quality of care orders.

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Railway FELA & Construction Workers’ Comp

Posted by on Sep 13, 2013 in Construction Accidents, Employment Law, Personal Injury, Workers' Compensation | 0 comments

The railroad industry is a lucrative business for many American laborers. According to the Association of American Railroads, people working in the railroad industry enjoy jobs ranging from engineers, dispatchers, law information, information technology, and industrial development. In addition to offering comprehensive benefit packages to workers, many railway companies are committed to employing veterans through the Joining Forces initiative.

Railroading jobs often demand high levels of physical exertion from their employees. The physically demanding setting of railways, coupled with the comparatively high potential of injury justifies the attractive benefits package included in railway workers’ compensation packets. The Federal Employers Liability Act (FELA) is a worker’s compensation act exclusively available to railway workers.

According to the website of the attorneys at Hach & Rose, LLP some high-damage accidents that occur on railways are head-on train collisions, derailment, crossing signal malfunction, platform gaps, excessive speed, non-operating tracks, mechanical failures, and boiler explosions. FELA protects victims of severe accidents including railway workers and their families. FELA cases are negligence-based, which requires the situation to be the fault of the railway company. Families are able to collect compensation for pain and suffering as well as lost wages when a worker suffers from a severe injury or even death.

Railway companies are responsible for maintaining the safest environment possible for rail workers in the same way that property managers and general contractors are responsible for providing well-marked working conditions for construction workers. According to the website of attorneys at Hach & Rose, LLP electrical lines should be marked clearly and powered down appropriately, natural hazards should be marked within the property, tools and vehicles should be operated properly, slip and fall hazards should be eliminated, and dangerous chemicals should not be present at a work site. When these maintenance requirements are violated property managers can often be held liable for injuries sustained by workers.

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