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Defective Pharmaceuticals

Actos’ Adverse Effects are Obvious Acts of Negligence

Posted by on Oct 18, 2013 in Defective Pharmaceuticals, Personal Injury | 1 comment

For a number of years after 1999, Type II diabetes patients benefitted from an oral drug that helped them manage their blood sugar level and reduced the quantity of glucose released by the liver. With no known cure to their illness and fully confident of their doctor’s capabilities, Type II diabetics accepted whatever drug was prescribed to them.

One oral drug that was recognized as very promising was Actos. Produced by Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc., and certified by the US Food and Drug Administration, Actos, or Pioglitazone, was released to the market in 1999. A year after its release, the drug was approved by the French Medicines Agency for distribution in France and then eight years later, it became one of the 10 most prescribed oral diabetes drugs in the US.

Since its release millions of people around the globe have been prescribed with the drug Actos. Thus, in 2010 many were taken aback by with the findings of a group of researches that studied Actos. The study brought into the open the many adverse effects caused by the drug, which Takeda maintained to be totally safe.

The effects ranged from mild to life-threatening; some patients have even suffered death due to Actos. Some of the mild effects caused by Actos include urinary tract infection, hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, upper respiratory infection, fever, dizziness, muscle pain, chills, limb pain and diarrhea. The severe ones are bladder cancer, lactic acidosis, heart and liver failure and macular edema.

In 2011 France and Germany banned the distribution of Actos in their countries. During this same year too the estimated number of lawsuits that seemed would be filed against the drug’s manufacturer Takeda reached more than 10,000.

Many more are expected to come to the open and seek justice from Takeda’s great act of irresponsibility and negligence. Type II diabetes is serious and hard enough for anyone to suffer from; adding bladder cancer to one’s suffering would redound to a major unjust offense.

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